Blog

An Update from Third Wave’s Board and Staff

June 2, 2011

We are pleased to share that Mia Herndon, our Executive Director, will spend the summer on sabbatical. For ten years Mia has given her loving spirit, visionary leadership and strategic support to our staff, grantees and the broader Third Wave community. We are grateful that we can honor her service with this gift of time to reflect and rejuvenate. Under Mia’s leadership, Third Wave has focused its grantmaking, technical assistance and thought leadership to provide strategic support for a growing number of youth-led organizations at the leading edge of social transformation. As a staff and Board, we are excited about the work ahead and will use the space of the sabbatical to prepare for the implementation of our strategic plan over the next three years – maximizing the skills, talents and innovations of the organization’s leaders and partners at all levels. Tara Ellison will be leading the organization in the role of Acting Executive Director until Mia's return in the fall. As Third Wave’s Deputy Director, Tara has demonstrated a deep commitment to the Third Wave mission and brilliance as a manager. She will guide the strategic operations of the organization with the support of Alex DelValle, Program Director, and McKensey Smith, External Relations Manager, and she will harness the expertise of the rest of the organization's talented staff. Our Board has confidence in this team and is committed to providing them with any support they may need to ensure that this process deepens our impact, strengthens our capacity as leaders, and allows us to better serve the movement that we have all built together. We think this is an effective and important model of how organizations can and must support and nurture social justice leaders in order to ensure that they can best create and serve. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact Mia, Kai Gurley, Third Wave Board Chair, or any of the members of the Board. During the sabbatical, please take the opportunity to reach out to the Third Wave team to offer your support and get to know them. We are excited to continue to learn from our community and to work with you to advance our work. Thank you again for being a part of this community with us and for making the work of Third Wave Foundation possible. Warmly, Third Wave Foundation Board and Staff

BOARD

Yasmin Ahmed dom brassey Adrienne Maree Brown Angélica Cházaro Andrea Flynn Tierney Gleason Kai Gurley Darshan Khalsa Carter Klenk Amoretta Morris Liza Siegler Mia Kim Sullivan Alexandra Teixeira

STAFF

Mia D. Herndon, Executive Director mia@thirdwavefoundation.org Tara Ellison, Deputy Director tara@thirdwavefoundation.org Alexandra DelValle, Program Director alex@thirdwavefoundation.org McKensey Smith, External Relations Manager mckensey@thirdwavefoundation.org Melissa Gira Grant, Senior Communications Officer melissa@thirdwavefoundation.org Rye Young, Program Associate rye@thirdwavefoundation.org Agatha Patterson, External Relations Associate agatha@thirdwavefoundation.org Christine Davitt, Administrative Assistant christine@thirdwavefoundation.org

Posted in: About Us

Written by:

Announcing Reproductive Health & Justice Initiative Grant Partners

February 17, 2011

We're proud and excited to announce that this year, Third Wave's Reproductive Health & Justice Initiative will support 23 organizations across the United States, representing an investment of over $500,000 in young people's innovative approaches to reproductive freedom. For Third Wave, reproductive justice work is premised on principles of self-determination and equity related to our decisions around bodies, sexuality, health and well-being, and reproduction. This expansive framework means that social justice work often includes a reproductive justice component. Our 2010 RHJI grant partners are: Multi-Year Grant Partners Different Avenues Jacksonville Area Sexual Minority Youth Network, Inc. (JASMYN) Kalpulli Izkalli Khmer Girls in Action New Voices Pittsburgh: Women of Color for Reproductive Justice St. James Infirmary Young Women's Empowerment Project Young Women United Discretionary Grant Partners Brown Boi Project Chicago Abortion Fund Colorado Anti-Violence Program Gender JUST Justice Now Media Literacy Project National Sex Worker of Color Network Power U Center for Social Change Sylvia Rivera Law Project Women with a Vision Young Women of Color HIV/AIDS Coalition In Partnership with the Catalyst Fund Choice USA Colorado Organization for Latina Opportunity and Reproductive Rights (COLOR) National Latina Institute for Reproductive Health SPARK Reproductive Justice NOW

Posted in: Blog, Grant Partners

Written by:

Become a Third Wave grant partner

October 4, 2010

Our 2010 Request for Proposals and Application for grant partners is out now. Support is available for non-profit projects, organizations, and collaborations engaged in community-based work to achieve gender, racial, economic and social justice. In addition to reaching out to organizations that explicitly locate themselves within the reproductive justice movement, Third Wave also encourages applications from organizations that have not historically identified with reproductive health and rights movements, but that take an intersectional approach to their work. View our application, learn more about our funding priorities, and join us for a support call with your questions. Our deadline is November 5th, and we'll be making decisions in early December.

Posted in: Community, Movement Building, Reproductive Justice

Written by:

Brown Boi Project Awarded 2012 Black Male Achievement Fellowship!

June 13, 2012

We recently celebrated that Cole, of Brown Boi Project (a Third Wave grant partner), was one of the 16 finalists for the inaugural class of Black Male Achievement Fellows.  We are thrilled to announce that Cole made it all the way, and was awarded the BMA fellowship!! The fellowship is part of a joint initiative by Echoing Green and Open Society Foundations (OSF) to support “visionary leaders who are generating new ideas for black male achievement in the areas such as fatherhood, mentoring, college preparatory programs, community-building, supportive wage work opportunities, communications, and philanthropic leadership”(Echoing Green). Cole should be proud of this high-profile achievement! Her work to empower and train "masculine-of-center" young people, and to shape a radical new vision of non-oppressive masculinity certainly deserves this support. To read Cole's fellowship profile, click here.

Posted in: Blog, Brown Boi Project, Grant Partners

Written by:

Celebrate 30 Years of CLPP’s “From Abortion Rights to Social Justice” Conference

April 6, 2011

This weekend Third Wave and our Reproductive Justice Network will be out in full force for the 30th anniversary "From Abortion Rights to Social Justice" conference, held by the Civil Liberties and Public Policy program at Hampshire College. For three days, social and reproductive justice activists from around the US converge on Amherst, MA for workshops and informal opportunities to network and build connections across the issues they're most passionate about. For those who can't attend, be sure to follow along with the conference liveblog.

Posted in: Community, Movement Building

Written by:

Celebrating Ada Lovelace Day

March 25, 2010

Jahajee SIsters, Third Wave grant partnerMarch 24th is Ada Lovelace Day, which is “an international day of blogging to draw attention to the achievements of women in technology and science.” This day was created in honor of one of the world’s first computer programmers, Ada Lovelace. To learn more about Ada Lovelace Day and the woman herself, you can check out this blog pledge page and Wikipedia. I’m honored to contribute to this day and to acknowledge some unsung heroes that contribute to a field that is oft prone to leaving out women -- especially young women and women of color. For this celebration, I want to write a little bit about one of our grant partners, Jahajee Sisters. Jahajee Sisters is a movement-building organization committed to building solidarity and fostering empowerment of women in the Indo-Caribbean community. They are working to introduce the concept of reproductive justice to young women in their community, and to cultivate the leadership potential of the next generation so they will work for change in the future. As a stepping stone to achieving this, they have held a Young Women’s Summer Leadership Institute, which includes media training for the participants to learn how to effectively use technology to raise awareness of reproductive justice within their community. With these skills, Jahajee Sisters wants their constituents to be able to stimulate dialogue around reproductive health and rights. I find this organization to be particularly amazing because this is a young organization that recognizes and addresses the needs of a marginalized community. In the 21st century, community organizing techniques have grown immensely to include new technologies for community engagement. I applaud Jahajee Sisters by not ignoring this facet of organizing and empowering their girls by teaching them how to be self-sufficient and learn how to use video on their own to reach justice in their community. They even provide the girls in their programs Flip Cams, giving them equipment which may have been inaccessible for them due to socioeconomic status. Technology is not just about sitting in front of computers and creating complicated code. We can make technology accessible for all women and use it to bring social change and justice for all.

Posted in: Blog, Grant Partners, Jahajee Sisters, Media, Movement Building

Written by:

Chicago Abortion Fund: Anti-Choice Billboards Shame Black Women

March 29, 2011

Chicago Abortion Fund Opposes Racist Anti-Choice Billboard Featuring Obama's Face, Chicago (anti-choice billboard image via Feministing) Third Wave grant partner Chicago Abortion Fund released this statement today, denouncing a new series of anti-choice billboards targeting communities of color -- this time, in their hometown Chicago:

Chicago Abortion Fund (CAF) is against the billboard being unveiled at 58th and State Streets on the South Side of Chicago on Tuesday, March 29, 2011. The ongoing anti-choice movement to target women of color in cities across the country is both despicable and deplorable. Not only is the ad attempting to shame black women but placing a picture of the President Obama alongside the message stoops to a new low. CAF demands that elected officials and community leaders immediately reject this racist billboard campaign. Life Always, the organization responsible for the billboard, is just one of the many anti-choice organizations seeking shock value through a message that many don’t believe. These organizations and their billboard campaigns fail to address the social conditions that create the need for abortions, including poverty and a lack of access to contraception and reproductive health care. Says Gaylon Alcaraz, executive director of the Chicago Abortion Fund, “These people who insist on shoving down our throats their anti-women messages through lies and misleading information should be ashamed of themselves. Women have a legal right to access abortion services and should not be shamed regarding the personal choices they make. Abortion is a personal decision, not a political discussion. We will not be moved by this anti-choice attempt to hijack our communities. Only we, women of color, can speak for our communities. Only we, women of color, know what is best for our families.”
Last year, similar billboards first began to appear in Georgia. Third Wave grant partner SPARK Reproductive Justice NOW successfully mobilized their community and allies in Atlanta to denounce the billboards and speak to the truth of black women's fight for reproductive freedom. For more on the network of anti-choice organizations funding these billboards, check out Miriam Zoila Pérez's investigation at Colorlines. Update (March 30, 2011): Gaylon Alcaraz on NBC Chicago, at yesterday's protest against the billboards:

Posted in: Actions, Ads, Chicago Abortion Fund, Reproductive Justice

Written by:

Choice USA & COLOR: Youth the Vote

September 28, 2010

Last week, Choice USA & COLOR collaborated with NARAL Colorado to bring together activists to defeat Amendment 62, which, if passed on Election Day in Colorado, would redefine a fetus as a legal person and effectively outlaw abortion. Their day-long training, Youth the Vote, covered voter registration and ways to get your community out to the polls. After, Choice USA shared this video on Facebook, showing some of the folks who turned out and why they are passionate about reproductive freedom: [flashvideo file=http://www.thirdwavefoundation.org/wp-content/uploads/2010/09/576190772123_50031.mp4 width=600 height=360 /]

Posted in: Blog, COLOR, Leadership, Movement Building

Written by:

CNN Misses the Mark on Third Wave Feminism

June 4, 2010

Carol Costello of CNN had a segment a few weeks ago that is supposed to explore "what could be the 'third wave' of feminism, and why that's troubling." They invited Jaclyn Friedman, the co-editor of Yes Means Yes: Visions of Female Sexual Power and a World Without Rape, to come in and interview for the video. Sadly, the end result is a very short segment titled "Bad Girls a Dangerous Trend?" complete with an inaccurate interpretation of a female pop artist's song that supposedly "celebrates promiscuity and drinking until you pass out in a stranger's bathtub." (You can read a transcript at Shakesville.) The segment does not address third wave feminism (or any feminism) at all (if the title and introduction didn't already give it away). It is a 2.5 minute clip that talks about a pervasive "raunch culture" that is creating violent "bad girls" who curse and drink too much. CNN misquotes Friedman to give the impression that a reputable well-known feminist agrees with the sentiments they're trying to pitch (to read Jaclyn's response to the segment and what she really said during the interview, click here). CNN provides a tired, sexist narrative that seems to make its round regularly on mainstream media. Reporters shake their hands in disbelief of this "new" trend of young women who drink "too much" and say that this causes them to be raped. When Jaclyn was approached with this sentiment, she says that everyone should be encouraged to drink responsibly, not just women. Instead of bringing real information or a "new" point of view into the spotlight, Costello jumps on the bandwagon of victim-blaming and finding scapegoats. While blaming feminism for imaginary outbreaks in promiscuity from women is not new, I was surprised that CNN wasn't even aware of the third wave of feminism. I thought a part of journalism is being well-informed and I pause to wonder how the network managed to miss a decades-old movement for so long and then interpret the Wikipedia article of the Third Wave as "bad girls who drink alcohol, curse and get themselves raped!" I hope that someone will want to break free from the mainstream media's affinity for ignoring feminism 90% of the time and mislabeling it or straight-up lying about it 10% of the time. Should we wait for that day to come when feminism won't be demonized on the likes of CNN and FOX? Do we try to place feminists, womanists, activists, social justice enthusiasts into the major newspapers, magazines, and TV channels? Or should we continue with creating our own media, where we blog our hearts out at Shakesville and interview the Hulk about his feminism?

Posted in: Media

Written by:

Coming Out of the Shadows: National Latina Institute for Reproductive Health Stands with Undocumented Immigrant Youth

March 28, 2011

Stephanie Alvarado, National Field Organizer at the National Latina Institute for Reproductive Health (NLIRH), spoke in support of the activism of undocumented immigrant youth at the March 2011 Coming Out of the Shadows Rally in New York's Union Square. NLIRH has been a major force in bringing the struggles and triumphs of immigrant women to the forefront of the reproductive health and women’s movements. "We stand with the DREAMers," said Stephanie. "Your bravery will not be in vain."

Posted in: Actions, Community, Immigration, NLIRH

Written by: